google-site-verification=_0_sxZ4ojUK-ECIFNj10tDeQPj5LctraszF78rDqQV4
benefits of ashwagandha

What Does Ashwagandha do to The Brain

Human society has been using herbal remedies for thousands and thousands of years. Through trial and error different cultures have discovered these amazing herbs and plants that give incredible benefits. Ashwagandha is one of those hidden gems that the indian culture discovered thousands of years ago and have been using to treat stress, fatigue, concentration and more.

It’s use as a nootropic brain supplement is hard to argue against for reasons we’re about to go over. What’s great about it is that it’s easy to take, has a lot of potential to help, and if it doesn’t help not very much was lost.

Make sure you talk with your physician if it will conflict with any medications you’re taking. Now it’s time to find out what does ashwagandha do to the brain.

Benefits of Ashwagandha

What does ashwagandha do to the brain?

There are numerous benefits of ashwagandha, so many that we can’t cover them all in this article, however we’ll try to cover the most beneficial benefits for the brain.

Ashwagandha is considered to be a nootropic, a supplement or substance that improves cognitive function, executive brain function, attention, memory, creativity, motivation or any other brain function. This being said ashwagandha is a very good nootropic supplement.

Anxiety

There are some brain conditions that have become more prevalent in recent years, one of those is anxiety. The reason is up for debate, but what we do know is that there are supplements that can help you improve the symptoms and make it manageable.

It’s been shown to be very beneficial for people suffering from anxiety. Specifically ashwagandha is very good for reducing agoraphobia (fear of open or crowded spaces), but still does a great job for reducing overall markers for anxiety.

A study in 2012 showed that patients taking ashwagandha for 2 months reported having significantly less anxiety overall than the group who received a placebo instead. It’s also shown to help reduce enlarged adrenal glands which can cause chronic anxiety.

Stress

Stress is a close cousin to anxiety and are almost always found together. This is commonly because of the stress hormone cortisol is connected to putting your brain on alert, and on a fundamental level leads to anxiety.

Ashwagandha serves to decrease the output of cortisol as well as reducing the effects of it on your brain. These two combined reduce stress greatly and thus promoting a powerful sense of calmness relative to how it was before suffering from anxiety.

Sleep

Ashwagandha is considered to be an effective sleep aid. Research has found that it actually helps people fall asleep faster, stay asleep longer, and have higher quality sleep overall.

In a study a group took ashwagandha for 6 weeks and experienced approximately 72% better sleep on average. This is because of it’s relaxing properties in reducing stress which can keep you mind racing before bed, not fully at rest while sleeping, and to promote a healthier sleep cycle.

Ashwagandha Dosage

Knowing how much to take is arguably the most important part is choosing a supplement. Taking too much can lead to some nasty side effects, and taking too little won’t yield hardly any results.

Ashwagandha is considered to be a very safe supplement. Dosage is considered to be safe for 1000mg daily for up to 12 weeks.

Staying within this range will give you a very good chance of not only getting the results you want, but giving you a good shot at avoiding all those side effects that can make your life fairly uncomfortable for a brief time.

Ashwagandha Side Effects

Despite being considered to be a very safe supplement, there are side effects associated with almost every single thing that goes into your body. If you eat too much of any food you’ll probably not feel very good.

Side effects of ashwagandha include an upset stomach, diarrhea, vomiting, as well as the very rare case of liver problems.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.